History on the Ridge 4/24/13

4/24/13

History in the Making at the North San Juan Senior Center

Deborah Love, Geli Duarte, Mary Moore, artistic director, and Skyler Meyers, enjoy stitching on Tapestry No. 5, the history of gold mining on the Ridge from 1970 to present, most Wednesday afternoons at the North San Juan Senior Center on Route 49, North San Juan.

Deborah Love, Geli Duarte, Mary Moore, artistic director, and Skyler Meyers, enjoy stitching on Tapestry No. 5, the history of gold mining on the Ridge from 1970 to present, most Wednesday afternoons at the North San Juan Senior Center on Route 49, North San Juan.

You too can be part of the history of the Ridge.  Come and stitch on Tapestry No. 5, now being created at the North San Juan Senior Center, Route 49, North San Juan, most Wednesdays, 2 p.m. “ Learning the art of tapestry is easy”, artistic director Mary Moore says, “ 125 people have been stitching from kindergarteners to 90 year olds.  We’ve even had a few brave men.”  13 Tapestries are planned in all.

The RidgeTapestry project is the vision of Martha Stone as a way to repay the community for all the good work and culture of the Ridge.  It is the history of the Ridge over the last 20 years, each tapestry commemorating a particular movement or event.

Tapestry No. 5 is the history of Gold Mining from 1970 to the present time.  Working on the tapestry is meaningful, not only because of the historical importance of the project, but because new friendships and stories are stitched together as well.  As it turns out this is a worldwide movement. After The Ridge Tapestry got started, Marsha Stone discovered other totally unconnected tapestry projects  around the world..   The passion to preserve the past in an ancient art form, the tapestry, is strong, and I imagine, addictive.

Artist Jennifer Crosby creates the original art for the tapestry.  It is then traced onto special linen fabric by Mary Moore, which costs $62 a yard.  Then it is Mary’s job to translate the original art into colorful fibers, all a special weight of wool yarn.  This is a time consuming task in itself.

When finished the tapestries are rolled up and placed in a special archival box, with other material to protect and preserve the tapestries.  They are put on display a few times a year at the North Columbia Cultural Center.  Everyone who has worked on a tapestry, and all donars,  have their names stitched into the back of the tapestry.   Donate to the Ridge Tapestry Project thru the North Columbia Cultural Center, directing your check to the Tapestry Project.  For more information: 277-0169

 

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