Plumas/Sierra Fair Award 1/31/18

The Plumas Sierra County Fair crashed the Western Fairs Association Convention with a series of First Place Awards. Although it did not win the prestigious Merrill Award, Fair Manager John Steffanic was pleased to receive four first place finishes in the general achievement awards. The Plumas Sierra County Fair is in the Class 1 category which includes all fairs with attendance up to 100,000. “This meant we bettered the likes of Santa Barbara and Napa County Fairs”, reported Steffanic. “It was extremely gratifying to be recognized as the best on the West Coast in these categories.”

The awards came for excellence in the areas of: Theme Program, for the 2017 theme of “Art to Ag”; Fair Logo, for its “Art to Ag” logo featuring Warhol like cows in sunglasses; Guest Services, for the popular Chipper Express golf cart tours; and Event Within An Event, for the Merrill Award finalist “Artopolis”. The fair was given beautiful certificates which Steffanic promises will be displayed at this year’s fair.

Each year, Western Fairs Achievement Committee chooses several awards as ‘Featured Awards”, and gives special attention to these at the closing banquet. The Theme Program was one of these special awards and the Plumas Sierra County Fair was given an impressive glass award honoring its first place finish for the “Art to Ag” theme. “It was awfully exciting to hear the words Plumas and Sierra in the Anaheim Convention Center,” Steffanic said, “I think we definitely showed up on the radar of many people during the convention.”

The local fair was also a finalist for the Merrill Award, named for the founder of Western Fairs Association. It is given to those showing innovation and creativity in the fair industry. Plumas Sierra was nominated for the 2017 installation of “Artopolis”. It was up against the San Diego County Fair, which gave free fair tickets to new U.S. citizens; The Alameda County Fairgrounds for its Digital Marketing Program; The Marin County Fair, that did an extensive theme program based on the Summer of Love, theirs being the Summer of Fun; and the New Mexico State Fair, which created an Autism Awareness Sensory Station. Although the award had been selected before the convention even began, each fair made a presentation about their project at the opening Leadership Luncheon. When the winner was announced at the Awards Banquet on Friday Night, the New Mexico State Fair and the San Diego County Fair shared the Merrill Award. “I know it sounds cliché, but it really was an honor being a finalist,” Fair Manager Steffanic said. “We made a splash with our presentation, and I know many will be looking for what we can do next year.”

The 2019 Convention will be held in Reno and Steffanic hopes this year’s theme of “Welcome to the Neighborhood” will be good enough to the catch the eye of the awards committee again. The Plumas Sierra County Fair, as well as many small fairs have not been recognized due to the fact that the process does take a little time and thought to enter. Many of the larger fairs actually have staff that spend a good amount of time preparing these entries. He says it was at the previous year’s convention that he asked other fairs in Northern California how many awards they have won, and got no response. He said there are many great ideas that come from small fairs and challenged the other fairs to enter. “It certainly paid off for our fair”, he said.

AEMT Graduation 1/31/17

Eleven Advanced EMT’s graduated on January 31, 2018 from a class sponsored by Sierra Frontier Medical Resources, Inc. (SFMR) and Downieville Fire Protection District. The class was organized and led by Frank Lang, MICN, Bette Jo Lang, Paramedic Rachel Defibaugh. Students were from Sierra, Yuba and Plumas counties and ranged in age from 20’s up to 71. An enthusiastic crowd of  approximately 60 family, friends and community attended the graduation, enjoying cake, cookies and cider after the graduation ceremony.

FBI Teen Academy 1/31/18

FBI Teen Academy Accepting Applications from High School Juniors
SACRAMENTO, CA – The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Sacramento Field Office encourages high school juniors attending class within the 34 counties the office serves to apply to upcoming Spring 2018 FBI Teen Academy. The full-day academy will be held on Friday, March 23, 2018, at FBI Sacramento Field Office headquarters in Roseville, Calif.
Students interested in the exciting, one-day program must log onto the FBI Sacramento Field Office’s Community Relations web page to download an application. Students must submit an application package, enclosing a completed application, signed release forms, and an essay—carefully following submission instructions—to be considered. Complete application packages must be received by mail, parcel delivery, or hand delivery at the FBI Sacramento Field Office headquarters no later than 4 p.m. on Thursday, February 22, 2018. Due to the need for original signatures, application packages are not accepted by fax or email.
The FBI Teen Academy offers students a unique view into the FBI and its mission, values, investigations, and partnerships with local, state and federal law enforcement. Discussion topics may include cyber safety, terrorism, active shooter situations, cyber investigations, and civil rights investigations. Activities may include simulated experiences with the FBI’s Evidence Response Team, Special Agent Bomb Technicians, and within the Firearms Training System (FATS) room. Students also engage in candid conversations about online communication and its risks as well as lifestyle choices required to be eligible for careers at the FBI with FBI personnel.
“The FBI Teen Academy helps youth better understand how we protect the American people and uphold the constitution. We also share how the decisions they make today may impact education and career options in the future,” said Special Agent in Charge Sean Ragan of the FB Sacramento Field Office. “Our goal is to provide students with useful information and valuable experiences they can share with others upon returning to their home and school.”

The FBI Teen Academy is open to all high school juniors attending any school—public, private, and home school. No minimum GPA or particular academic path is required. The full-day experience is offered at no charge to students but families may incur travel costs if they live a significant distance away from FBI Sacramento Field Office headquarters.

Direct link to the FBI Teen Academy Application:
The 34 counties served by the FBI Sacramento Field Office are:
Alpine, Amador, Butte, Calaveras, Colusa, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Inyo
Kern, Kings, Lassen, Mader, Mariposa, Merced, Modoc, Mono, Nevada
Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Sierra, Siskiyou, Solano
Stanislaus, Sutter, Tehama, Tulare, Tuolumne, Trinity, Yuba, Yolo.

Skiing Kinda Local 1/31/18

The skiing should be really, really good. Freshly groomed trails, except the Dog Trail (The Dog Trail, if groomed, would melt out within a day or two…it needs more snow). Groomed a set track on most of the trails and a wide skating lane (see report below for specific trails info.).
Speaking of more snow, none is expected in next 10 days or so, so with the warm weather, go out and get the skiing now! The skiing should be good for the next week…pray for more snow! Groomed everything for skating, most all with a set track. Will most likely regroom on Thursday for the weekend. Watch for unmarked obstacles and later in the week for thin spots.

Two special notes: The groomers went out and skied (diagonal stride) after grooming and had a great time on fresh tracks. The other note, is, that when you are out skiing and see folks walking or running the trails, please, please, stop them and tell them that these are ski/snowshoe trails and that pedestrian traffic is not allowed. It takes a much longer volunteer effort to eradicate the footprints in the snow so that skiers and snowshoers can enjoy the snow. THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT IN THIS!

Another special thank you to all who have supported our volunteer grooming program in the past (no state funds are used for this program). Please consider donating to our efforts to keep them ongoing. And of course, gratitude to all the volunteers who donate their time to the trails.

Again, this year, our entire funding comes through donations to PESPA (Plumas Eureka State Park Association, P.O. Box 1148, Graeagle, CA 96103. There is also a donation slot on the Museum door at the Museum Trailhead). There are no trail fees, but we do wish that you consider donating to the program. Suggested donations are $5.00/day per person, $25.00/person for the season and only $35.00/family for the season.

Dogs are not permitted on the Jamison or Museum Trailhead trails, but a separate Dog Trail is groomed across from the Jamison Trailhead, for both skiers, snowshoers and their canine friends. There is no fee for the Dog Trail, but we ask that you pick up after your pets. There is a pet station/bags at the Kiosk. Go out and enjoy winter skiing and snowshoeing!!!

JAMISON TRAIL: Groomed, skating lane, with set track.                             HARPER’S WAY: Not groomable at this time, needs more snow
​​​​CAMP LISA: Groomed, skating lane, some set track
​​​​UPPER CAMPGROUND: Groomed, skating lane, with set track
CAMPGROUND: Groomed, skating lane, with set track
LOWER CAMPGROUND: Groomed, skating lane, some set track
BEAR SCAT FLAT: Groomed, skating lane, with set track
PLUMAS-EUREKA: Groomed, skating lane, with set track
DOG TRAIL: Open, but not groomed at this point, it needs more snow.

AVALANCHE ADVISORY: The Central Sierra Nevada Mountain Avalanche Advisory is issued daily by the Sierra Avalanche Center (SAC), covering the Northern Sierra Nevada mountain range from Ebbett’s Pass (State Highway 4, Alpine County) to Yuba Pass (State Highway 49, Sierra County). It applies to back-country areas outside of developed ski areas only. For daily avalanche advisory information, go to the SAC website at www.sierraavalanchecenter.org, or phone (530) 587-3558.
www.thegoldrushgallery.com

ESV Chamber Meets 1/31/18

Chamber meeting Saturday February 3rd 2018 at 10:30 Golden West,  Loyalton

Topics: Country Market/Bazaar, Car Show, Tour DeManure, Highway 49 clean up, Sierra County Vistors Guide, budget for 2018/2019, Sierra County and Sierra Valley events and much, much more.

Please find it clear to make to this most important meeting as Spring and Summer is just right around the corner.

Best regards, Mike 993-0453

CA EPA Award 1/31/18

EPA awards Diesel Emissions Reduction Act grants for clean air projects in California

SAN FRANCISCO – As part of the West Coast Collaborative, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $7,076,382 in Diesel Emission Reduction Act (DERA) grants to California to curb harmful pollution from large diesel sources, such as trucks, buses, and agriculture equipment.

“Clean diesel technologies not only improve air quality, but advance innovation and support jobs,” said EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt. “These projects will significantly reduce harmful emissions and directly benefit the health of residents.”

“By promoting clean diesel technologies, we can improve air quality and human health, advance American innovation and support green jobs in economically disadvantaged communities, while growing our economy,” said Alexis Strauss, Acting Regional Administrator for EPA’s Pacific Southwest Region. “Public-private partnerships like the West Coast Collaborative are leading the way on reducing harmful diesel emissions and creating jobs.”

The DERA program is administered by EPA’s West Coast Collaborative, a clean air public-private partnership that leverages public and private funds to reduce emissions from the most polluting diesel sources in impacted communities in West Coast states and U.S. Territories.

Award recipients in California:

South Coast Air Quality Management District was awarded $1,050,000 to replace ten 2012 or newer diesel trucks with new trucks powered by engines certified to meet California Air Resources Board’s optional low nitrogen oxide emission standard. The 2012 and newer trucks will be used to replace ten model year 1995–2006 heavy-duty diesel trucks, which will then be scrapped in Washington State.

The City of Long Beach Harbor Department was awarded $2,423,448 to replace old marine vessel and cargo handling equipment engines with Tier 3 and all electric zero emissions engines operating at the Port of Long Beach. The funds will be combined with $3,354,772 in matching funds from the Harbor Department’s project partners, Foss Maritime, Curtin Maritime, and SSA Marine, to implement the project.

San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District was awarded $1,239,959 to replace agricultural tractors and equipment operating in the San Joaquin Valley. Combined with $6,587,258 in matching funds from San Joaquin Valley Air District and participating fleets, this project will replace ninety-two diesel-powered agricultural tractors or loaders with new agricultural equipment with cleaner Tier 4 engines.

San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District was awarded $1,150,000 to replace large trucks operating in the San Joaquin Valley. Combined with $6,109,420 in matching funds from San Joaquin Valley Air District and participating fleets, this project will replace fifty-two old diesel-powered delivery trucks with new trucks with cleaner engines.

Bay Area Air Quality Management District was awarded $639,670 to replace an old diesel switcher locomotive with a new cleaner Tier 4 locomotive operating in goods movement service in the San Francisco Bay Area. The funds will be combined with $1,931,792 in matching funds from Bay Area Air District’s project partner, Oakland Global Rail Enterprise, LLC, to implement the project.

California Air Resources Board was awarded $573,305 to replace school buses operating throughout the State of California. Combined with $3,102,396 in matching funds from the California Air Resources Board and participating school bus fleets, this project will replace nine diesel school buses with all-electric, zero-emission buses.

Including the grant award to California, EPA has awarded nearly $12.5 million in DERA funding to recipients in Alaska, American Samoa, Arizona, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon and Washington to reduce diesel emissions from large diesel sources, such as trucks, buses, agriculture and port equipment. These projects will improve air quality by reducing over 3,000 tons of nitrogen oxide and 200 tons of particulate matter from over 350 medium and heavy duty diesel engines.

Reducing particulate matter emissions has important public health and air quality benefits and reduces black carbon.

To learn more about all of this year’s West Coast Collaborative DERA projects, visit: http://www.westcoastcollaborative.org.

For more information about EPA’s National Clean Diesel campaign and the national DERA awards, visit www.epa.gov/cleandiesel

EPA Award for Nevada 1/31/18

EPA awards Diesel Emissions Reduction Act grant for clean air project in Nevada

SAN FRANCISCO – As part of the West Coast Collaborative, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded a $348,002 Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) grant to Nevada to curb harmful pollution from large diesel sources, such as trucks, buses, and agriculture equipment.

“Clean diesel technologies not only improve air quality, but advance innovation and support jobs,” said EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt. “These projects will significantly reduce harmful emissions and directly benefit the health of residents.”

“By promoting clean diesel technologies, we can improve air quality and human health, advance American innovation and support green jobs in economically disadvantaged communities, while growing our economy,” said Alexis Strauss, Acting Regional Administrator for EPA’s Pacific Southwest Region. “Public-private partnerships like the West Coast Collaborative are leading the way on reducing harmful diesel emissions and creating jobs.”

The DERA program is administered by EPA’s West Coast Collaborative, a clean air public-private partnership that leverages public and private funds to reduce emissions from the most polluting diesel sources in impacted communities in West Coast states and U.S. Territories.

Award recipient in Nevada:

Nevada Division of Environmental Protection was awarded a $348,002 grant to replace six old diesel public works trucks and six old diesel school buses with new vehicles with new engines.

Including the grant award to Nevada, EPA has awarded nearly $12.5 million in DERA funding to recipients in Alaska, American Samoa, Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Oregon and Washington to reduce diesel emissions from large diesel sources, such as trucks, buses, agriculture and port equipment. These projects will improve air quality by reducing over 3,000 tons of nitrogen oxide and 200 tons of particulate matter from over 350 medium and heavy duty diesel engines.

Reducing particulate matter emissions has important public health and air quality benefits and reduces black carbon.

To learn more about all of this year’s West Coast Collaborative DERA projects, visit: http://www.westcoastcollaborative.org.

For more information about EPA’s National Clean Diesel campaign and the national DERA awards, visit www.epa.gov/cleandiesel.

BLM & USFS Grazing Fees 1/31/18

BLM and Forest Service announce 2018 grazing fees

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Federal grazing fee for 2018 will be $1.41 per animal unit month (AUM) for public lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management and $1.41 per head month (HM) for lands managed by the USDA Forest Service.

The 2017 public land grazing fee was $1.87. An AUM or HM—treated as equivalent measures for fee purposes—is the use of public lands by one cow and her calf, one horse, or five sheep or goats for a month.

The newly calculated grazing fee was determined by a congressional formula and takes effect March 1, 2018. The fee will apply to nearly 18,000 grazing permits and leases administered by the BLM and nearly 6,500 permits administered by the Forest Service.

The formula used for calculating the grazing fee was established by Congress in the 1978 Public Rangelands Improvement Act and has remained in use under a 1986 presidential Executive Order. Under that order, the grazing fee cannot fall below $1.35 per AUM/HM, and any increase or decrease cannot exceed 25 percent of the previous year’s level. The annually determined grazing fee is established using a 1966 base value of $1.23 per AUM/HM for livestock grazing on public lands in Western states.

The figure is then calculated according to three factors—current private grazing land lease rates, beef cattle prices, and the cost of livestock production. In effect, the fee rises, falls, or stays the same based on market conditions.

The BLM and Forest Service are committed to strong relationships with the ranching community and work closely with permittees to ensure public rangelands remain healthy, productive working landscapes.

Fifty percent of the collected grazing fees deposited into the U.S. Treasury are returned to the Range Betterment Fund for on-the-ground range improvement projects. Portions of collected fees are also returned to the states for use in the counties where the fees were generated.

The grazing fee applies in 16 Western states on public lands administered by the BLM and the Forest Service. The states are: Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. Permit holders and lessees may contact their local BLM or Forest Service office for additional information.

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $75 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2016—more than any other agency in the Department of the Interior. These activities supported more than 372,000 jobs. The Forest Service, an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, manages 193 million acres of Federal lands in 44 states, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. National forests and grasslands are working lands that provide a multitude of benefits to the American public, from forest products like wood and food, to opportunities for world-class recreational experiences that also provide health benefits. Forest Service programs and work contribute to 360,000 jobs and more than $30 billion to the gross domestic product.

Joyce Becomes a Lion 1/31/18

1/31/18 Joyce White is inducted to the Downieville Lions Club by Vice-President Mike Galan at their January meeting. Joyce is the DFPD Dispatch Supervisor and a board member of the Golden Rays. DVL meet the 3rd Monday each month contact club Secretary Karen Galan at 289-3595 or Membership Liz at 289-3632 for more information or to arrange a complimentary dinner visit.

Ludi at the Yuba Theatre 1/31/18

Ludi Hinrich

The Sierra County Arts Council is pleased to present Ludi Hinrichs “THE JOY OF MUSIC ACROSS THE GLOBE” as part of our Artists in Schools program. Ludi will be performing a student assembly at The Yuba Theatre in Downieville on Feb. 8 at 10:30am. Ludi’s music is a reflection his own journeys to several continents, and the direct experience of performing and collaborating with master musicians and teachers from the US, India, Africa, Canada, Japan, Australia and Indonesia over the last four decades. Ludi offers our students the experience of hearing the unique beauty and commonality of diverse World cultures.

Ludi will perform samples of some of the World’s cultures utilizing voice, gong, harps, metallophones and wind instruments to visually and sonically open the student’s parameters of what music is, while actively requesting their participation, and at the same time enhancing the specific core elements of melody, rhythm, harmony, texture, structure and ensemble awareness.

Ludi has over forty-five years of teaching and performing in public schools and venues both in the US and abroad. Currently Ludi is lending his talents to teach our elementary students music at Downieville School. You may learn more about Ludi at his website www.ludihinrichs.com.

The entire community is welcomed to join the students for this special performance at The Yuba Theatre. This event is sponsored by a grant from the California Arts Council and by matching funds from the Sierra-Plumas Joint Unified School District and from contributions for our local community. Thank you to all the volunteers and to staff from our schools for making this amazing opportunity available to our students. Sierra County Arts Council is the State-Local Partner with the California Arts Council. For information call B.J. Jordan at 530-289-3673 or visit the Arts Council’s website www.sierracountyartscouncil.org.

Diamond Mountain Watershed 1/31/18

Eagle Lake District announces Diamond Mountain Watershed Restoration and Wildland Urban Interface Project moving forward

SUSANVILLE, Calif. — The Lassen National Forest announced today that the highly collaborative Diamond Mountain Watershed Restoration and Wildland Urban Interface Project has been approved and will proceed into the implementation stage.

Acting Lassen National Forest Supervisor, Ted McArthur, hailed the efforts from Eagle Lake Ranger District employees who worked closely with the Lassen County Fire Safe Council and Sierra Nevada Conservancy. “This project is a testament to what we can accomplish at the community level,” said McArthur. “We look forward to beginning the work in this area and working with our valuable partners in seeking new opportunities for similar projects.”

“The project’s primary goals include completing large-scale landscape restoration work designed to create more resilient forests by reducing fuels and fire behavior, improving forest health and watershed function, and increasing safety for fire suppression activities on both private and public lands around Susanville and Janesville,” said Chuck Lewis, Eagle Lake Ranger District fuels specialist.

“Lassen County Fire Safe Council, Inc. (LCFSC) is delighted that the USFS Diamond Mountain Watershed Restoration Project Environmental Assessment has been completed and the decision notice has been signed”, said Lloyd Keefer, LCFSC chair. This represents a key milestone in the Diamond Mountain Initiative’s (DMI) quest to restore the forest and an important watershed in the greater Susanville community. DMI represents a broad coalition of agencies and landowners that began their efforts over three years ago. “That a major project can be developed by the USFS and be rolled out uncontested demonstrates the strength of collaboration at the community level”, said Tom Esgate, LCFSC Director. “All the DMI participants take great pride in helping to make this happen and now it’s back to work, helping to find the money to bring the project to fruition.”

“Sierra Nevada Conservancy is pleased to have helped set the stage to accomplish more forest restoration in the Diamond Mountains” said SNC Executive Officer, Jim Branham. “We certainly appreciate the groups and individuals working locally to move this effort forward.”

The Diamond Mountain Initiative is a joint public/private partnership that includes the US Forest Service, US Bureau of Land Management, CAL FIRE, Susanville Indian Rancheria, Lassen County, Lassen County Fire Safe Council, Inc., Honey Lake Valley Resource Conservation District, Susan River Fire Protection District, HL Power and private landowners. The National Forest Foundation has also provided LCFSC with capacity funding to support DMI.

Specifics on the project can be found here.

The mission of the U.S. Forest Service, part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is to sustain the health, diversity and productivity of the nation’s forests and grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations. The agency manages 193 million acres of public land, provides assistance to state and private landowners, and maintains the largest forestry research organization in the world. Public lands the Forest Service manages contribute more than $13 billion to the economy each year through visitor spending alone. Those same lands provide 20 percent of the nation’s clean water supply, a value estimated at $7.2 billion per year. The agency has either a direct or indirect role in stewardship of about 80 percent of the 850 million forested acres within the U.S., of which 100 million acres are urban forests where most Americans live.

Wednesday January 24, 2018

Taking a moment to appreciate our businesses who stay open year round for locals, visitors and tourists and don’t forget the people who come to Downieville on business or work here. Coyoteville 289-1820 is always open for breakfast and lunch from 7 a.m. till 2 p.m. thank you Audie and Patrick. John at Jadaa’s 862-5016 and Steve at the St. Charles 289-3237,  have committed to have dinner each day during the off season when many places have closed. Thank you Steve and John.

Equality means equality… for women and for men… this is not a “get even” or revenge moment… this is the opportunity to really deliver on equal pay and opportunities for all. Sex, Race, Religion, Culture have no meaning in what constitutes  a good employee in any profession. We, us humans, need to continue engaging our brain to get smarter, develop empathy, compassion and kindness, what the world needs now is love… Gosh, where have I heard those words before…seriously please let us continue to evolve and not regress to the age of stupidity.

“I would love to do it, and I would like to do it as soon as possible,” Trump said at the White House. “I would do it under oath, absolutely.” Ok, I think the tell word her is “would” he already has the tense… I’m just waiting for the next line saying who “won’t let him testify” .

I really do try to find a balance in the Prospect between local and guest columnist but sometimes one outweighs the other and this week words and thoughts by Mel Gurtov and Winslow Myers are particularly riveting and although the columns are lengthier than usual the information gained is well worth gathering, so please read and ponder for awhile. Of course Carol wants us to go to the movies and Carrie wants us to be safe, Chief Lozano wants us to eat spaghetti and buy raffle tickets (great prizes as always).

So the photo this week is near the overlook to the Great Sierra Valley at the Yuba Pass Vista Point taking by Lee Adams on his way to Supes meeting in Loyalton.

Advanced EMT Grads 1/24/18

The following Advanced EMT Students will graduate on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 at the Downieville High School, Rm 5 at approximately 8 PM. Everyone is invited to join the ceremony. The Course ran from November 1st, 2017 through January 30th, 2018. The Course was sponsored by Sierra Frontier Medical Resources and Downieville Fire Protection District. They have completed 80 hours of classroom study, 40 hours of Emergency Room, and 40 hours of Advanced Life Support Training on the Ambulance at Enloe Medical Center. Classes were taught at Downieville High School by Frank Lang, NP, MICN and assisted by Bette Jo Lang, RN, Rachel Defibaugh, Paramedic, Downieville Ambulance Paramedic and Steve Folsom, Downieville Fire Advanced EMT. All students will be licensed by Nor-Cal EMS, and Certified by The National Registry of Advanced EMTs. The Course was part of a 3 year plan by Sierra Frontier Medical Resources teaching Homemaker Health Aides, Emergency Medical Responders, Emergency Medical Technicians, Advanced Emergency Medical Technicians and developing the Western Sierra County Paramedic Project.

David Keyes, Jose Avelos, Shaun Felton, Leslie Baker, John Evans, Brandi Dudek, Diane Wharff, Megan Andaluz, Brian Attama, Mike Galan, Patrick Shannon.

Megan Andaluz Loyalton VFD, Brian Attama Portola & Loyalton Ambulance. Leslie Baker Alleghany VFD, Brandi Dudek Camptonville VFD, John Evans  Loyalton VFD & Portola Ambulance, Shaun Felton Pike City VFD, Michael Galan Downieville VFD & Ambulance, Dave Keyes Sierra City VFD, Patrick Shannon Downieville VFD & Ambulance Diane Wharff  Downieville VFD & Ambulance, Jose Avelos Eastern Plumas Health Care.

Disaster & Hazardous Training 1/31/18

On May 4th I will be sponsoring an Advanced Disaster Medical Response ADMR Course at Eastern Plumas Health Care’s Training Facility in Portola. While the instructor is still here, I am planning a Hazardous Materials First Responder Operations class Saturday May 5th. Location to be determined by the interest level.

The second day Hazardous Materials class meets the 29 CFR 1910.120 (q) and Title 8, CCR 5192 (q) requirements for first responders. For your reference I have attached a synopsis of the regulations (particularly relevant areas are highlighted). It is my understanding a single violation can incur a $30,000.00 fine, even to a volunteer organization.

1. Is this something your personnel need and are interested in, or are you already compliant?
2. Courses and materials will be grant funded so classes are free to participants. How many do you think will be able to participate on Saturday?

Actual flyers will follow once I have all details lined out. If there are others who should be on this email please feel free to forward and copy me. Any and all feedback is welcome.

LeTina Vanetti, Sierra County Public Health, Emergency Preparedness Coordinator
Office 530-993-6737

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